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Monthly Archives: May 2010

The NewTimes Experiments at Craft Chemistry

Written by admin  • May 26, 2010

The Syracuse NewTimes featured Craft Chemistry, located right here at 745 North Salina Street, in it’s most recent issue.

Carousel Center, deep in its phase of everlasting expansion, appears to be bursting at the seams, yet it’s rare to ever walk away from that shrine to capitalism with something unique in hand. So if you desire something fresh, funky and original, take a peek inside Craft Chemistry, a mile or so south of Carousel at 745 N. Salina St. There you’ll discover a multi-functional art boutique that sells one-of-a-kind items crafted by local artists, as well as recycled home goods, organic seeds, indie comic books and other novelties.

Click here to read the rest of the article.

Free Film Screening at ArtRage Gallery

Written by admin  • May 25, 2010

Don’t miss the free screening of Syracuse’s 15th Ward and Beyond, this Thursday at 7pm (doors open at 6pm, first come first served) at ArtRage Gallery (505 Hawley Ave, Syracuse, NY).

For a description of the documentary in an article from the Post-Standard, click here.

Join us for a special screening of the South Side Initiative’s new video documentary, Syracuse’s 15th Ward and Beyond & A Tender Record Closing Reception.

Onondaga Historical Association Executive Director Gregg Tripoli will be there to represent the South Side Initiative.
Last fall, Syracuse University’s South Side Initiative and the local Black History Preservation team sponsored a bus tour of old Syracuse: the 15th Ward and other historical sites. Some 30 senior members of the community, who have lived in Syracuse for at least 40 years, participated. The tour and the participants’ stories and recollections of Syracuse’s past were filmed for a documentary, “Syracuse’s 15th Ward and Beyond.” The documentary was created by local filmmaker and SU alumna Courtney Rile.

Among the former sites the tour participants visited were the Ebony Market, Croton Elementary, Old Dunbar, The Glass Bottom and Open Door lounges, Ben’s Kitchen, the Father Brady Center for Black Catholics and Washington Irving Elementary School. “The Black History Preservation Project is a direct response to the South Side community’s interest in more fully representing Syracuse’s rich history,” says Linda Littlejohn, associate vice president for SU’s South Side Initiative. “We are privileged to develop a virtual community museum that celebrates the history and heritage of black people in the Syracuse region with community residents, the City of Syracuse’s Office of Multicultural Affairs, the Onondaga County Public Library, the University’s Black Syracuse project, SU’S E.S. Bird Library and the Onondaga Historical Association. We also acknowledge the Dunbar Association for the use of their space.

Imagination Library Brings “Warm, Cozy” Feelings to Syracuse

Written by admin  • May 21, 2010

Times were tough growing up in the Smoky Mountains, writes Dolly Parton. “One of my most precious memories is sitting in my mother’s lap and listening to her read me stories,” she writes. “It felt so warm and cozy. My imagination soared to places far beyond our little cabin.” To read the rest of the Post-Standard editorial article on the Imagination Library Program, sponsored by the Literacy Coalition of Onondaga County, and the kick-off event this past Saturday at White Branch Library on Butternut St. click here!

It sounds too simple to be true, but by reading regularly with your children during their preschool years, you are giving them the biggest boost toward a successful education they will ever get.

Dolly Parton’s Imagination Library will help you read with your child. There are many reasons parents do not read to their child, but we can eliminate one of them. Every child will have books of their very own, at no cost to you, thanks to the Literacy Coalition of Onondaga County, United Way’s Success By 6, the Central New York Community Foundation, LeMoyne College, St. Joseph’s Hospital, and a growing list of partners.

Each month, a new, carefully-selected book will be mailed in your child’s name directly to your home. He/she can look forward to new and exciting reading adventures from Dolly Parton’s Imagination Library until he/she turns five years old as long as you remain a resident of zip code 13203 or 13208.  Should the child move outside the target area, he/she automatically will exit the program.

Dolly Parton’s Imagination Library is a FREE GIFT to our children! All you have to do is read to your children.

Who is Eligible?

Preschool children (from birth until their fifth birthday) in zip codes 13203 & 13208. Sign up today at www.onliteracy.org or by calling 428-8129. 

ArtRage Gallery Splashes onto the NewTimes Front Page

Written by admin  • May 20, 2010

ArtRage Gallery has been featured in this week’s NewTimes, you can check it out by picking up a copy at your local distribution spot or by clicking here. Also, if you enjoy musicals with an edgy political and social message, or you would simply like to support this unique gallery that pushes us to confront social injustices through art and education, be sure to check out Falsettos at 8pm Friday and Saturday at ArtRage (505 Hawley Ave.) as a joint fundraiser for the gallery and the theater group Rarely Done Productions. A review of the show is also featured in the NewTimes, you can read it here.

Also, don’t forget, tonight is Th3 (Third Thursday) in Syracuse, with an art talk at ArtRage (at 7pm, click here for more information) and a half-year old celebration at C2 Craft Chemistry. So whether you’re hungry for knowledge or cake, your appetite for art can certainly be met on the Northside tonight.

Photos by Micheal Davis of the NewTimes.

Craft Chemistry Half-birthday Fun on Thursday

Written by admin  • May 18, 2010

Craft Chemistry [C2] is celebrating six months of bringing wacky, weird, funky and beautiful art and programming to the Northside. Stop by between 5-7pm, this Thursday 5/20 for an informal discussion and CAKE. C2 is looking to talk about how craft chemistry can creatively experiment with the next 6 months! So, bring ideas, suggestions, solutions, chemistry tools and an appetite for cake. For more information click here.

Nobody Sneeze: Aunt Josie’s Continues to Receive Awards for Meatballs

Written by admin  • May 12, 2010

Winning once is nothing to sneeze about, but twice? Well that’s just the Northside’s Aunt Josie’s, which is now the two-time defending champion in the Meatball Madness Competition held every March to benefit Elmcrest Children’s Center. According to today’s Post-Standard, Aunt Josie’s embodies the quintessential Syracuse restaurant, but don’t take our word for it, click here to read the full article on Syracuse.com or click the read more link below.
 
The Caruso family at Aunt Josie’s continues tradition of award-winning meatballs
By Don Cazentre / The Post-Standard
If you were to create the quintessential Syracuse restaurant, it would probably be a family-owned place serving deep bowls or large plates of hearty Italian fare, more than likely on the city’s North Side.
“It’s blue collar food,” said Mike Caruso, a member of the family that has run Aunt Josie’s Restaurant on North Salina Street for nearly 50 years. “It’s food like you make at home, but that you may not take the time to make any more. We do. That’s why it’s popular.”
Aunt Josie’s isn’t the only such place – there’s Angotti’s, Dominick’s, Joey’s, Rico’s, Santangelo’s and many more in the city and suburbs.
But Aunt Josie’s can say this: It is now the two-time defending champion in the Meatball Madness competition held every March to benefit Elmcrest Children’s Center. This year, the Aunt Josie’s crew won its second trophy not long after the death of Michael “Pop” Caruso Sr., who helped guide the restaurant through much of its existence.
The legacy is carried on by members of the immediate family: Pop’s son, Mike Caruso; daughter-in-law Barbara; grandson Mikey; and granddaughter Nicole.
And always someplace nearby is Pop’s wife of 58 years, Philomena, the daughter of Josephine Marnell, who gave the place its name. Philomena, who worked for years in the kitchen alongside her husband, is now retired, sort of.
Befitting a family place, the Carusos say the secret behind their prize-winning meatballs will remain a secret, closely held within the family.
But they’ll offer some hints: Aunt Josie’s meatballs, for example, are all beef, Mike Caruso said. And they use garlic oil, instead of chopped up garlic.
This last point, which Caruso made while sitting in the restaurant dining room with his mother and other family members, raises the kind of debate that is surely common in family-run establishments:
“Some people like the garlic chunks,” Philomena Caruso interjected.
“Sure they do, Ma, but look at the (Meatball Madness) trophy,” Mike Caruso answered. “That tells you something.”
Aunt Josie’s opened under that name on Halloween night in 1961, though it had been open under some different names, including Marnell’s, before that.
Philomena Caruso remembers that it initially shared space in the building at 1110 N. Salina St. with a fruit and vegetable shop called Shorty’s.
Pop Caruso was originally a mason, and Josie, his mother-in-law, taught him to cook so he could help out when needed. It turned into a career for him and the whole family.
Aunt Josie’s was part of a thriving North Side restaurant scene that was more than just Italian: The classy Tubbert’s was nearby, and there were a good number of German places, like Gruen’s and Weber’s, too.
“We outlasted them all,” Philomena Caruso said.
Any place that has been a city landmark for five decades is sure to have some stories attached to it. Here’s one of the Caruso family’s favorites:
It happened during the administration of former Syracuse Mayor Lee Alexander, an Aunt Josie’s regular.
One day there was huge snow storm and the whole city was buried, Philomena Caruso remembered. As the day wore on, no snowplows appeared.
“Mom (Josie) said she was going to call the mayor, because he was such a good customer, to see what he could do about it,” Philomena Caruso said.
Sure enough, Josie got the mayor on the line and “she explained that she couldn’t do business with all that snow in front.”
The reaction was quick, said Mike Caruso, picking up the story.
“A little while later, we start hearing these trucks rumbling up the street,” he said. “All these trucks. It looked like the Marines coming in. They cleared everything, but only up to the corner. There were snow banks everywhere on Salina except right here in front of the restaurant.”

Over the years, Aunt Josie’s recipes and menu have been resistant to change. That’s still the case, to a point.
“You can now get potatoes with some things,” Mike Caruso said. “You used not be able to get a potato.”
The signature dish, and the best-seller, is still the Aunt Josie’s Special, also known as the “AJ.” It’s cavatelli with broccoli and mushrooms in a garlic and butter sauce.
When change does come, it’s more of a slow evolution.
Take the ravioli: Aunt Josie’s chefs still make the ravioli by hand – rolling, cutting, shaping, filling and boiling. It takes eight hours each week to make.
For years, all the ravioli was filled with ricotta cheese. Now they make spinach and meat varieties, and occasionally seafood.
The Ravioli Trio — cheese, spinach and meat — will soon make its Aunt Josie’s menu debut. A recent special of eggplant parmesan, sausage and meatball lasagna and two ravioli was such a hit it’s likely to make the menu, too.
Mike Caruso believes in sticking to the methods, ingredients and service that have kept Aunt Josie’s going since 1961.
“It’s hard to compete with the chains, the Olive Gardens, and all their advertising and pre-prepared food,” he said. “But we’re still just as busy now as we ever were.”
Aunt Josie’s Special
From Aunt Josie’s Restaurant
1 stick of salted butter (cut into small cubes)
6 steamed broccoli spears
2 cups of cooked white mushrooms
1 pound of precooked cavatelli pasta
1 large clove of garlic (minced)
Fresh parsley for garnish
On low heat, melt butter in large saute pan. Add garlic and heat for 2 minutes, add broccoli and mushrooms and heat for an additional 2 minutes while combining the ingredients together. Add precooked pasta and fold into the ingredients already in the pan. Heat and combine thoroughly the pasta, vegetables, garlic and butter, garnish with fresh parsley and serve in a large pasta bowl. Makes 2 servings.
 

All Aboard the Imagination Library

Written by admin  • May 7, 2010

Next Saturday, May 15 from 10am – noon don’t miss a chance to sign up for Dolly Parton’s Imagination Library program.

During the day you’ll hear stories read by local celebrities, a chance to meet Scooch from the Syracuse Chiefs, and enjoy free refreshments, raffles and face painting!

It sounds too simple to be true, but by reading regularly with your children during their preschool years, you are giving them the biggest boost toward a successful education they will ever get.

Dolly Parton’s Imagination Library will help you read with your child. There are many reasons parents do not read to their child, but we can eliminate one of them. Every child will have books of their very own, at no cost to you, thanks to the Literacy Coalition of Onondaga County, United Way’s Success By 6, the Central New York Community Foundation, LeMoyne College, St. Joseph’s Hospital, and a growing list of partners.

Each month, a new, carefully-selected book will be mailed in your child’s name directly to your home. He/she can look forward to new and exciting reading adventures from Dolly Parton’s Imagination Library until he/she turns five years old as long as you remain a resident of zip code 13203 or 13208.  Should the child move outside the target area, he/she automatically will exit the program.

Dolly Parton’s Imagination Library is a FREE GIFT to our children! All you have to do is read to your children.

Who is Eligible?

Preschool children (from birth until their fifth birthday) in zip codes 13203 & 13208. Sign up today at www.onliteracy.org or by calling 428-8129.

Look Around, the Northside wins Several Awards for Revitaliztion Efforts

Written by admin  • May 6, 2010

The Preservation Association of Central New York, an organization “dedicated to the conservation of our area’s historic architecture, neighborhoods and mainstreets,” recognizes the hard work of two building owners on North Salina Street and a Northside organization for contributing to the historical integrity of the neighborhood. The association will give awards to the following champions of adaptive reuse today: Northeast Hawley Development Association, for fostering the preservation and vitality of the Near North Side; Walier Lofts Rehabilitation on North Salina Street, for contributing to the revitalization of the city’s core; and Pavia’s Supermarket, for the facade work owner Mike Zokari performed with help from a city program.

In addition to the award, Mike Zokari and the work he’s done on Pavia’s has been featured in a Post-Standard article today. Click here to read the full article on the Syracuse.com website.

St. Joseph’s Celebrates National Nurses Day

Written by admin  • May 4, 2010

On Monday, May 10 St. Joseph’s Hospital will celebrate nurses with a special event. The event is part of a national appreciation of the 3.1 million registered nurses nationwide in honor of National Nurses Week, celebrated annually from May 6 – 12.  This year, the American Nurse Association (ANA) selected the theme of the week to be “Nurses: Caring Today for a Healthier Tomorrow.”  It also celebrates the 2010 Year of the Nurse, which marks the 100th anniversary of Florence Nightingale’s death.  Florence Nightingale was the founder of the modern nursing profession in the mid-1800s.

All day, St. Joseph’s nurses will experience relaxation, massages, musical entertainment, food, door prizes and more.  The event is sponsored by St. Joseph’s Hospital’s Clinical Services.

The event also celebrates St. Joseph’s as one of the first of 60 hospitals in the U.S. as a designated Magnet Hospital.  Magnet status is awarded by The American Nurses Credentialing Center’s (ANCC) Magnet Recognition Program® for excellence in nursing services and professionalism, and is widely accepted as the gold standard of patient care.

“This year is especially important because it’s the international year of the nurse,” said Loretta Quigley, Associate Dean at St. Joseph’s College of Nursing.  “Since healthcare is in the news all the time, it’s so important to recognize the nurses that are on the front line of healthcare, from bedside nursing in hospitals and long term care facilities to the halls of research institutions, state legislatures, and Congress.”

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