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Monthly Archives: June 2017

Photo Friday: Red, White, Blue

Written by Mary Beth Schwartzwalder  • June 30, 2017

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Carving Through Borders: Exhibit at ArtRage Gallery

Written by Mary Beth Schwartzwalder  • June 28, 2017

Image Credit: ArtRageGallery.org | Left: "Image by Mazatl. He is an activist and artist who lives in Mexico where he partakes in several collectives seeking social/political/environmental justice."

Image Credit: ArtRageGallery.org | Left: “Image by Mazatl. He is an activist and artist who lives in Mexico where he partakes in several collectives seeking social/political/environmental justice.”

 

“When you’re interacting with art it’s a moment for you to connect with the story.” – Favianna Rodriguez, artist and Co-Founder of CultureStrike

ArtRage Gallery’s current exhibition, “Carving Through Borders,” showcases large-scale woodcuts from fifteen artists exploring the experiences of documented and undocumented immigrants. Using woodcuts to make prints has a long history in social justice movements and ArtRage’s display seeks to illustrate “various aspects of migration—detention, deportation, displacement, discrimination—and also communities’ resistance and resilience.”

The pieces on display were made in 2014 as part of Syracuse University’s printmaking program. Professor Holly Greenberg and her students traveled to San Fancisco’s Mission District to set up a print making shop and work with local artists to produce large-scale prints intended for use as flags and banners in protests across the country. To learn more about their project and the artists involved, check out the video below made by Daylight Blue Media.

 

 

 

“Carving Through Borders” will be on display until July 7, closing out ArtRage’s exhibits for their summer hiatus. In Tandem with the show, a Butterfly Wing Workshop is scheduled for July 5 at 7:00 PM to celebrate the themes of “migration” and “transformation.” Participants will paint and decorate wings to be worn at marches or rallies. You must RSVP to participate: email info@artragegallery.org  or call 315-218-5711.

To learn more about the exhibit, visit ArtRage’s website or read this review in The New Times.

Photo Friday: “Come As Strangers, Leave As Friends”

Written by Mary Beth Schwartzwalder  • June 23, 2017

Guests at InterFaith Works‘ World Refugee Day Celebration look on as different speakers and artists reflect on the importance of culture and community in our city and the world beyond.

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NBP Member Interview Series Featuring Paul Roe and Gina Santucci

Written by Rachel Nolte  • June 14, 2017

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Editor’s Note: The Northside Business Partnership is an association comprised of Northside businesses, property owners, and organizations. It serves as an advocate group for the Northside, strengthening the vitality of the business community by connecting, engaging, and promoting its members. NBP is administrated by NEHDA.

 

 

 

 

Paul and Gina are the owners of The James Street Parlour, a new tattoo shop on the Northside of Syracuse. While their shop is new, the history of the building is lengthy, built in 1872 and housing a cabinet maker, a Syracuse city mayor, and a funeral home over the years. Read on to learn more about the current owners and what drew them to this beautiful building.

 

The main room of the James Street Parlour.

The main room of the James Street Parlour.

 

Q: So, the most obvious first question is, how did you end up in Syracuse?

 Paul: Well, Gina, my wife, is from Utica, Rome, Syracuse—

Gina: I went to school here, and this is home. I worked for congress for twenty-something years, and congress is not the same congress as it was when I started (laughter). It wasn’t as fun, and I decided I wanted an early retirement. We had spoken to each other a lot over the years about, “Well, do you want to go back to England eventually?” And, he doesn’t. He wanted to live here. He’s been here . . . 26 years?

Paul: 26 years, yeah.

Gina: So this is home for him too. I didn’t want to live in DC anymore. The people here are friendly. It’s beautiful. I know people complain about the traffic here, but there is no traffic here! There is NO commute. So this was a no-brainer for us, really. I wanted to come.

Paul: It feels a lot like England. It really does.

 

Q: In what way?

Paul: It’s the post-industrial city with giant universities, very much like my hometown. It’s about the same size, the outlying countryside is very similar to England, the climate is really similar to England, not like 110° and 98% humidity in DC.

Gina: Augh, yeah that was another big factor in our decision to move north.

Paul: We literally said every single summer, that’s it. We have to move. We have to move.

Gina: I can’t stand it. You can’t be outside for any length of time! The mosquitos. All of those things.

Paul: We started looking. We went to Little Italy, and looked at buildings there. We had our eye on a building and there was a bidding thing going up on it, so we decided to look at other areas in the city. We looked downtown, we looked on Erie Boulevard, Water Street, there was one in the middle of Hawley-Green, and as we were driving up James Street, our real estate agent said “Have you seen this place?” Yes, yes yes. We saw that one online but it doesn’t look like it’s for sale. He said, “Well actually, it’s for sale. It’s just not listed. Do you want to have a look? Gina, do you want to have a look?”

Gina: I definitely wanted to have a look because I had seen it listed online a couple of times and the history of it attracted me. But also, there were no pictures of the inside. I really wanted to see what was going on in here.

Paul: So we walked in the door, in the back door, and we walked about 25 feet and got into that middle room, and she turns and said “I want this.”

Gina: I did. I did. I stood there and I whispered it actually. I said (whispering) “I want this. I must have this.”

Paul: And that was that. We sold the house in DC.

 

Left: One of the many columns of historic flash tattoos that are on display.  Center: One of two original fireplaces in the main parlor, one for coal burning and one for wood burning. Strangely, the marble mantle had been painted over and the couple had to laboriously remove it.  Right: Even the bathroom has interesting images of various tattoo machines. The eye is never lacking for something to see.

Left: One of the many columns of historic flash tattoos that are on display.
Center: One of two original fireplaces in the main parlor, one for coal burning and one for wood burning. Strangely, the marble mantle had been painted over and the couple had to laboriously remove it.
Right: Even the bathroom has interesting images of various tattoo machines. The eye is never lacking for something to see.

 

Q: Are you fascinated by history because you like tattoos or are they separate things that have happily come together?

 Paul: I’ve always been fascinated with history. English history as a schoolboy is basically two-thousand years of history. When you think about American history, you’re sitting there in school and learning American history—

Gina: Sweetheart, we don’t only learn American history (laughter), just so you know that.

Paul: We have to learn about empire—

Gina: We do too.

Paul: But you skirt over it.

Gina: No we don’t.

Paul: It’s a whole year for it. Just for the Romans.

Gina: Oh stop.

Paul: Just for the Romans.

Gina: We’ve had this conversation. He’s just a little arrogant about his English history, that’s all.

Paul: Of course. I’m an Englishman (laughter). And after we stopped owning the world—I’m interested in pattern recognition. That’s all I do. That’s all I do. It’s a very simple way to learn a style, is to analyze the code that makes that style that style. Tattooing, the line work, the shading, the density, the color spectrum, the composition, they can fall within certain parameters and it looks like old school American. Change two of those parameters and now you’ve got 1910 European. Thinner lines, slightly less black, slightly muted color scheme, Victorian tattooing. Change the lines a little bit, finer, two, three colors, now go Asian. Now you’re into Japanese influence from when Japan opened up in 1950. . . It’s in the code. You just have to read it.

Gina: The world has changed a lot in your field and your craft. Back when you started, everything was oral. Not everything, but quite a lot of it. So, I think that’s where your desire to seek out more information came from.

Paul: I had to go and sit down with the old man and talk to him.

Gina: Exactly. If you wanted to know something, you had to ask.

Paul: I couldn’t read the guy’s Facebook page.

Gina: ‘Cause they don’t do Facebook and also there was no Facebook then!

Paul: If you suggested that he share it with 100,000 strangers, he’d not only throw you out but he’d make sure your legs were broken before he threw you out. That’s completely changed.

 

The Dragon Room featured, like many other parts of the house, beautiful wood details that had been painted over when the couple purchased the property. For instance, where we now see gold trim, somebody had actually painted the lovely wood brown. So the couple has done their best to polish the space and resolve mistakes of the past. In this case, it meant an updated mural and more elegant trim. The overall effect pays homage to tradition but with a twist of Paul’s style.

The Dragon Room featured, like many other parts of the house, beautiful wood details that had been painted over when the couple purchased the property. For instance, where we now see gold trim, somebody had actually painted the lovely wood brown. So the couple has done their best to polish the space and resolve mistakes of the past. In this case, it meant an updated mural and more elegant trim. The overall effect pays homage to tradition but with a twist of Paul’s style.

 

Q: When did you get your first tattoo and what was it of?

 Paul: I was 17. It’s a Japanese bat flying out of the rising sun on my chest and it was a symbol of the Kendo Dojo that I was at when I was a teenager. Swordsman, which is where my whole fascination with Japanese art comes from, and the Bushido and the code of honor, which is very chivalrous and ties into the whole British—you know, a gentleman’s word.

Gina: The fellow who did it—

Paul: —Steve—

Gina: —Steve, you got to work with him.

Paul: I did. It was weird. That was when I was 17, so I started tattooing when I was 30. A couple of years in, I was on the internet! It’s young and fresh and new and we’re using it to contact. A friend of mine that I went to school with, Grace, she was the only other Goth in the school, so we used to hang out together. She was a year younger than me. And she’s married, and she’s got a kid, and she’s working in this tattoo shop. And I’m like, “Wow, it’s crazy ’cause I’m tattooing now. Where are you working?” “Oh, I’m working with Steve.” “You’re working with Steve?” “Yeah, I’m managing his shop.” “Ok then. Um. Can I come and do a guest spot?” She’s like, “Oh he’d love that.” So I went and I worked for 2 weeks. Did a guest spot with him, he tattooed me. I was 7 years in because I got my laurels for a journeyman (At this point, Paul gestured to the tattooed laurels on his arm). So he tattooed me, I tattooed him, but he tattooed me and then he said, “I’ve got some things for you.” So he went downstairs and he brought up two tattoo machine frames. One is a Davis Burchett from 1915 and the other is a 1927 Milton Zies, just the frame. He said, “This is the machine I tattooed you with when you were 17” and gave it to me. I built it up subsequently, I built the whole thing up and I took it back and I was going to give it to him, and he said “No, no no. It’s your machine.”

 

Inside the Dragon Room, there is a cabinet that displays a variety of fascinating tattooing devices. We did not discuss these during my interview, but I’m certain that each of these items has a story behind it.

Inside the Dragon Room, there is a cabinet that displays a variety of fascinating tattooing devices. We did not discuss these during my interview, but I’m certain that each of these items has a story behind it.

 

Q: Where does your interest in tattooing stem from?

 Paul: His shop was around the corner from my school, my high school, and from age 12 to 16, I would press my face up against that glass. I had a paper round and the news agent was three doors down. So I used to throw up at 5 o’clock in the morning on my bicycle. If the news agent had been out drinking the night before, he wasn’t going to be there on time, so I knew I had a few minutes. I would go and literally I would place my face up against the glass and try and see inside and look at the images in the shop, on Burr Street, in the Red Light District.

Gina: Didn’t you also say that one of your uncles had a tattoo that captured your imagination?

Paul:  Uncle Ray. My father was royal Airforce, and the royal Airforce do NOT get tattooed. The army do. My Uncle Ray, his brother, was army. And I remember when I was maybe 6 or 7, he said that one of them was a panther and one of them was an eagle and they were just sort of blurs and smudges, but they fascinated me because they were pictures on Uncle Ray! Why didn’t any of my other uncles have pictures on them? Dad, why don’t you have pictures on you? “’Cause I’m Airforce!” Oh, okay.

It’s always been there. It’s always been everywhere, every person is related to a group of people that tattooed and I find that fascinating. It’s a single bond. We are animals that decorate. That’s it. That’s the only thing that separates us. It’s innately human to do this. It’s been driven out of a lot of cultures politically or religiously, but it’s the basic operation of the human mind. I am me, I can make me prettier! Look, ooh, that’s lovely, I want to do that now! Everybody does it.

 

To learn more about the history of the James Street Parlour building, join NEHDA on its annual historic house tour. Get your tickets here!

Take a Walk Through History: Join Us for the Hawley-Green House Tour!

Written by Lexie Kwiek  • June 13, 2017

Lexie2_for webEditor’s Note: Lexie is a proud AmeriCorps VISTA alum with a master’s degree in Communications & New Media Marketing from Southern New Hampshire University. She currently works as the Volunteer & Community Engagement Coordinator for the Syracuse Northeast Community Center and NEHDA. We’ve asked her to write guest posts for us, taking a deeper look into the Northside, its businesses, organizations, and residents. All of her posts can be found under the “Syracuse Northeast Community Center” and the NEHDA categories.

 

 

This year's event features four never-before-toured buildings, and two that were under construction during the 2016 tour, but have since completed renovations.

This year’s event features four never-before-toured buildings, and two that were under construction during the 2016 tour, but have since completed renovations

The Northeast Hawley Development Association (NEHDA) invites you to explore the neighborhood’s most stunning homes. All tours begin at Quality Inn & Suites Downtown (454 James Street) starting at 10:30 am. Tours depart at 10:30 am, 11:30 am, 1:00 pm, and 2:00 pm. Advance sale tickets are available for $10 online or at the NEHDA offices (101 Gertrude Street, Syracuse 13203).  Day-of tickets are $15, cash only.

Nestled in a triangle bounded by James Street, Lodi Street, and Burnet Avenue, the Hawley-Green Historic District boasts some of the earliest—and finest—residential architecture in Syracuse. This is a real neighborhood defined by central location, desirable density and a sense of community. There is no better way to become acquainted with the charms of this area than to stroll its quaint streets and see inside its restored homes at the Hawley-Green House Tour.

217 Green Street was one of the "works in progress" featured on the 2016 House Tour. This year, guests will be able to see the finished product!

217 Green Street was one of the “works in progress” featured on the 2016 House Tour. This year, guests will be able to see the finished product!

Tours begin at 10:30 am at the Quality Inn & Suites Downtown lobby, located at 454 James Street. Free parking is available in the hotel lot.  This year’s event features four never-before-toured buildings, and two houses that were under construction last year, but have since finished reconstruction. There will also be a bonus stop at Thanos Import Market (105 Green Street), where guests will learn the history of the shop while sampling some of their renowned cheese, olives, and meats.

Along with learning the history of the Hawley-Green neighborhood, guests are also able to see inside of six unique buildings to see what original features still remain.

Along with learning the history of the Hawley-Green neighborhood, guests are also able to see inside of six unique buildings to see what original features still remain.

The entire tour is personally guided with commentary on the history of the houses, neighborhood lore, and current and potential economic development. At various vantage points the tour will see how enlightened investment and visionary restoration are extending the boundaries of Hawley-Green, transforming it into a historic district for the 21st century.

Purchase your ticket here and come learn the stories behind the houses on Saturday, June 17th!

World Refugee Day Events: June 20

Written by Mary Beth Schwartzwalder  • June 12, 2017

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WHAT: World Refugee Day Community Orientation About Inclusion and the Refugee Experience

WHEN: Tuesday, June 20 from 2:00 – 5:00 PM

WHERE: CNY Philanthropy Center, 431 E. Fayette Street

During this orientation, individuals throughout the community will participate in a presentation and panel discussion to explore “the everyday issues and concerns faced by refugees; the institutions, facilities, and agencies that support New Americans, and the ways that an engaged citizenry can help newcomers to our communities.” The event begins with a conversation addressing “Who are Refugees and Why Receive Them?” from Abdul Saboor, former refugee and Match Grant Coordinator at InterFaithWorks, and our own Dominic Robinson, Vice President of Economic Inclusion at CenterState CEO.

Following the conversation, a panel of service providers for the refugee community will address “What Does it Mean to Effectively Serve Refugees in Syracuse?” featuring Christina Costello, Director of Health Services ay Catholic Charities of Onondaga County; Janet Lenkiewicz, Case Manager at Onondaga County Department of Social Services Economic Security; Jacki Leroy, Director of ENL Services at the Syracuse City School District; Habiba Boru, Job Developer at RISE Refugee & Immigrant Self-Empowerment; and Shelly Tsai, Staff Attorney at Legal Services of CNY.

This event is free, but attendees must register in advance here. For a full description of the event, click here and follow the Facebook event for more information.

 

WHAT: World Refugee Day Celebration: “Come as Strangers, Leave as Friends”

WHEN: Tuesday, June 20 from 6:00 – 9:00 PM

WHERE: Dr. Weeks Elementary School, 710 Hawley Ave.

Celebrate “culture, community, and cuisine” at this family-friendly event, featuring food, entertainment, and a welcoming address from Mayor Stephanie Miner.

You must register for this event here. A donation of at least $1 is required to attend. For more information, follow the Facebook invite.

 

Both World Refugee Day events are brought to you by InterFaith Works, Refugee & Immigrant Self-empowerment (RISE), Providence Services of Syracuse, Catholic Charities of Onondaga County, Legal Services of CNY, Volunteers Lawyer Project, and the Onondaga County Bar Association.

Photo Friday: Flamingo on N. Salina Street

Written by Mary Beth Schwartzwalder  • June 9, 2017

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CYO’S Refugee Youth Program Presents: A Celebration of Refugee Success

Written by Mary Beth Schwartzwalder  • June 7, 2017

Photo credit: CCOC blog

 

WHAT: Syracuse United: A Celebration of Refugee Success

WHEN: Sunday, June 11 from 1:00 – 5:00 p.m. — rain or shine

WHERE: Nottingham High School on the Varsity Sports Fields (3100 E. Genesee Street)

The Refugee Youth Program of Catholic Charity’s CYO has organized a family-friendly event this Sunday to celebrate the refugee community and the many cultures in our neighborhoods. This free event features live singing and dancing, comedy performances, arts and crafts for kids, a silent auction, fashion show, displays celebrating the athletic and educational achievements of different students, and more. Ethnic food and henna art will be available for purchase during the event and all proceeds will benefit the CYO.

For more information, visit Catholic Charity’s blog or join the Facebook event.

Photo Friday: Bloom-lined Streets

Written by Mary Beth Schwartzwalder  • June 2, 2017

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