e: info@northsideup.org | ph: 315.470.1902

115 W Fayette Street Syracuse, NY 13202

What's Happening

Category: Inspiration from the Neighborhood

Photo Friday: Cali Nellis Khakoo

Written by admin  • March 2, 2018

“Collaboration between governmental and nonprofit agencies, with neighbors and property owners, is crucial in the neighborhood revitalization process to ensure that all people and places within the neighborhood are equitably represented and served by the projects undertaken in the effort to improve quality of life in the city. The unique perspectives expressed by each invested organization or individual lend themselves to developing unique solutions in addressing the development and service challenges in the Northside and I am proud to serve on the steering committee as one voice among many for the good of the neighborhood.”

 

For more reflections by our Steering Committee, click here. Interested in getting involved? Send us an email at info@northsideup.org.

Photo Friday: Michael Collins

Written by Mary Beth Schwartzwalder  • January 19, 2018

“’We all do better when we all do better.’ It’s the most succinct way to say something I’ve always believed, and my position creates the opportunity to influence that, especially for our neighbors at the margins. My work sits at the intersection of supporting front-line heroes and using the stories heard through that work to influence policy so people can have a chance at success. That I get to do this work with the amazing staff and volunteers I spend my days with is beyond rewarding. We had a coat give-away (in December) when schools were closed for a snow day, and all of our volunteers – all neighbors, many of whom use our services when they need a little help – figured out childcare so they could come in and make sure the give-away was a success. When our volunteers are that invested, it’s incredibly inspiring. Seriously, how cool is it to get paid to do that?” – MICHAEL COLLINS | executive director of Syracuse Northeast Community Center

 

For more reflections by our Steering Committee, click here. Interested in getting involved with the Steering Committee? Send us an email at info@northsideup.org.

Photo Friday: Mark Cass

Written by Mary Beth Schwartzwalder  • January 12, 2018

In January of last year, we re-launched Northside UP as a program administered by CenterState CEO’s Economic Inclusion team (link to blog post),  under the guidance of a community-led steering committee and with staff support from Stasya Erickson and Jonathan Link Logan. We’re grateful for the team we’d established in our first year – a committee of dedicated, passionate individuals working collaboratively towards outcome-oriented solutions, rallying around a shared vision for our neighborhood and helping advise projects. We’d like to spend some time highlighting the members that have been part of this journey with us, as well as sharing new faces as they join us over the next few months.

“I’ve always believed in the power of collaboration, but in our increasingly diverse, connected and complex world, I now think it is absolutely fundamental to positive change. Effective neighborhood revitalization can’t be done without true collaboration, which leads to broad resident and business engagement,  identification of synergies, and addressing conflicting interests.” – MARK CASS | executive director of the North Side Learning Center

Interested in getting involved with the Steering Committee? Send us an email at info@northsideup.org.

Photo Friday: Nadia’s Northside

Written by Mary Beth Schwartzwalder  • December 8, 2017

Thank you, Nadia Ahishakiye, for taking over our Instagram this week and showing us what it’s like to be a seventeen year old living on the Northside! To view all of her photos, visit our Instagram or Facebook.

Do you love taking photos of the Northside? Send us a message and check out all of our Insta Takeovers: www.instagram.com/explore/tags/nsuptakeover

 

 

“Foreigners Like Me” from Hopeprint

Written by Mary Beth Schwartzwalder  • December 6, 2017

This latest think piece from Hopeprint picks apart important concepts in our culture: “foreigner,” “majority,” “kindred.”

“They walked up the street with the babies in the stroller, dimly lit by the street lights. Though it was impossible to see their faces from across the road, their silhouettes and posture as they walked was recognizable in the way it only is when you have come to know someone. I raised my voice and hand, saying ‘Hello!’ Mom looked over and returned the greeting with a grin across her face. 

Due to a rather absurdly full season of grant writing, conferences, meetings, budget building, curriculum development, traveling to other cities for our multiplication efforts and more, the chance this evening to stand still and greet my neighbor felt like an extra treasure. As I spent a good deal of the evening alternating between coloring and building lincoln logs with their son, Ahmed, not speaking a lick of Farsi or Pashto (his mother tongue as an Afghani), I pondered anew the journey our friends take to get across the ocean to their new and foreign land… new kinds of houses, new language, new trash system, new transportation system, new ways to access food, new kinds of food, and on and on it goes.

Ahmed was quite content with not trying to understand me; he was just going to keep living his life, observing passively. Meanwhile, little Lisha pulled a book out of the bookcase, and sat on my lap to read it. As the pages turned, she could nearly quote the whole thing to me, making it clear she has spent a whole lot of days in our home with that book. Her little tongue rattled off imaginary stories and creative expressions in the primary tongue of her birthplace, English, differing from the Nepali tongue of her mother. 

Lisha knows the Nepali dishes that usually fill her family table, but she also knows chocolate chip cookies. Ahmed is dressed in the typical fashion forward, sharp manner of his fellow Afghani, Syrian and Iraqi 3-year-old peers, but is overwhelmed and lost in an almost entirely unknown world. Lisha’s presence in our living room exudes familiarity. Ahmed’s presence in this space exudes this sense of foreignness. 

Ahmed is young, and I know from years of watching little Ahmeds grow up, that in 18 months from now, he will be chattering away in a language he was clueless of today. He will not remember the land of his birth as an active memory, and this nation of the United States will be what he knows as home. His parents speaking Pashto at home, or the colorful hijab his mother continues to wear, will ever remind him he is of a particular people, but he will find himself in the strange gray of being foreign and familiar in his own home and nation of eventual citizenship. 

Ahmed and Lisha will spend all to nearly all of their lives in the borders of this nation that welcomed their families. In their personal identity, they will carry very little of their family being factually “foreigners” at one point. Culturally connected or bicultural, yes absolutely; but foreigner would not be the narrative of their own writing. Yet unless if the story changes, Ahmed and Lisha will spend the rest of their days keenly aware of this part of their heritage. The beautifully dark olive tint of Lisha’s skin, and her gorgeous Nepali features, will likely speak before her mouth does to the world she encounters. Ahmed’s name and maybe someday his wife in hijab will serve as a preface to his story written by others not himself. Whether Lisha or Ahmed feel or see themselves as foreign, and irregardless if they are no longer foreign as naturalized citizens, they will never really be allowed to forget it. This is the cultural craftsmanship of our ‘majority’ culture . . .”

To read the entire blog entry, visit Hopeprint’s website.

Photo Friday: Meet Nadia

Written by Mary Beth Schwartzwalder  • December 1, 2017

“My name is Ahishakiye Nadia. I’m seventeen years old. I’m a senior and currently attending PSLA@Fowler. I’m Burundian, but was born in the country Tanzania. I moved to the Northside in 2012 from Idaho. I really love the Northside. It’s a very beautiful place with many beautiful and unique cultures. I love learning about the different cultures and people around the world, many of which live on the Northside.”

Connect with us on Instagram to follow Nadia’s Insta Takeover: www.instagram.com/northsideup. Each day we’ll share one of her favorite photos of the Northside.

Thank You!

Written by Mary Beth Schwartzwalder  • November 23, 2017

Feeling thankful today for the partners and neighbors that make our work possible. It is through our collective energy, passion, and hard work that positive change can take place in our neighborhood.

 

“Wow, Syracuse. I want to go there:” Welcoming Economies Convening + Northside Tours

Written by Mary Beth Schwartzwalder  • October 16, 2017

WE-Convening

 

Next week, organizations, business owners, and individuals across the United States will convene in Syracuse to learn more about “cutting edge policies, successful programs, innovative ideas, and a network of trailblazers in our emerging field of immigrant economic development.” The Welcoming Economies event begins on Monday, October 23rd and ends on the 25th.

The Convening features a number of workshops and community tours. We’re most excited about:

1. Northside Tours

On Monday afternoon, participants can choose from several tours, three of which focus on the Northside: Building Community Amidst Constant Change: The Realities of Northside Micro-Neighborhoods; Food on the Northside: The Language that Needs No Translation; Creating safe and inclusive spaces for Faith: The Journey of Converting a Historic Church into a Welcoming Mosque.

 

2. Ignite Talks and Welcoming Reception

The first day of the conference ends with a fast-paced session where organizations give a five minute presentation about innovative ideas they’re adopted. The Talks are emceed by Nicole Watts of Hopeprint and Joe Cimperman of Global Cleveland.

A My Lucky Tummy pop-up follows the Ignite Talks, with food from Burma, Pakistan, Somalia, South Sudan, and Syria.

 

3. Community Organizing Case Study: Perspectives form Organizers and Community Members in the Near Westside Peacemaking Project

This panel is made up of leaders and participants of the Peacemaking Project, an innovative community organization model, that will share best practices with attendees.

 

We’re also excited to see the debut of a video about New Americans in Syracuse and their impact on the small business and workforce industries. Here’s two teasers to get you just as excited as we are:

 

To register for the conference, visit the We Global Network’s website. For those in Syracuse, you can use the local discount to save money on your registration. Go to the registration page and click on “Enter Promotion Code” in blue at the top of the registration form. Enter code LocalDiscount and press “Apply Code.”

This conference is hosted by CenterState CEO and  WE Global Network, a program of Welcoming America in partnership with Global Detroit. For more information about the Welcoming Economies Convening, visit CenterSatte CEO’s website.

October 2012: “A headdress of peacock feathers dripping with pearls”

Written by Mary Beth Schwartzwalder  • October 5, 2017

Fairy Tales are beloved by children (and adults) generation after generation. And so are these paintings that hang in the White Branch Library. We’re throwin’ it back to a post from October 2012 when we dug a little further into the history of this local artwork.

——–

Depicting Fairy Tales: Artwork at White Branch Library (originally published October, 13, 2012)

It’s impossible to miss the three large paintings hanging in the Children’s Room at the White Branch Library. The art nouveau pieces in shades of orange, navy, green, and brown set the scene for three classic fairy tales: Cinderella, the Pied Piper of Hamlin, and Jack and the Beanstalk. Beautifully painted with fun details (the fairy godmother in Cinderella wears a headdress of peacock feathers dripping with pearls), the magic of these stories pushes the boundaries of imagination—no matter your age.

The panels were painted by Syracuse’s own Margaret Huntington Boehner, an award-winning painter. Born in Oneonta, New York in 1894, Boehner attended Syracuse University’s College of Fine Arts and began teaching there shortly after graduation in 1922. Early in her career Boehner painted the three panels that were given to the White Branch Library by the Friends of Reading of Onondaga County. The fairy tales remain on permanent display in the Children’s Room.

Although a Syracuse resident for much of her life, only a handful of Boehner’s works actually remain in the city. The three panels at White Branch Library are an important part of our local history, but also our personal history on the Northside, as patrons fondly remember the pictures from their childhood.

Visit the White Branch Library in order to appreciate all the details of Boehner’s vision. How do these fairy tales compare to your own imaginings?

 

WhiteBranchLibrary_Painting_2

 

WhiteBranchLibrary_Painting_4

 

WhiteBranchLibrary_Painting_3

 

WhiteBranchLibrary_Painting_1

 

Photo Friday: NEHDA’s Community Photography Show

Written by Mary Beth Schwartzwalder  • August 25, 2017

Photo credit: David Haas. To view all of the submissions to the Northside Photography Show, visit: www.facebook.com/pg/NehdaInc/photos/?tab=album&album_id=839331309570203

Photo credit: David Haas. To view all of the submissions to the Northside Photography Show, visit: www.facebook.com/pg/NehdaInc/photos/?tab=album&album_id=839331309570203

This collage by David Haas was submitted to NEHDA to be considered for their Northside Photography Show on September 8th.

Do you have photos of the Northside? Submit your image by September 1st by sharing it to NEHDA’s Facebook page. Check out their album for details about how your photo could be displayed at their event.

 

bg